Author Topic: RC3 segmentation fault in linux  (Read 947 times)

rowbearto

  • Senior Community Member
  • Posts: 1543
  • Hero Points: 113
RC3 segmentation fault in linux
« on: September 28, 2016, 09:25:40 pm »
Just got a segmentation fault with RC3 in linux.

I am searching for the core file. How to know where the core file is?

patrick

  • SlickEdit Team Member
  • Senior Community Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1165
  • Hero Points: 110
Re: RC3 segmentation fault in linux
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2016, 09:31:57 pm »
Depends on the distribution.  Newer Ubuntu's that have "apport" enabled will have a crash report under /var/crash.

For everything else, the core file will be dropped in the working directory of the process when it crashed.  So if you had a project open, it would probably be in the project's root directory.  When you start up SlickEdit, you can run "pwd" at the SlickEdit command line to see what its working directory is.  Also, you'll only get a core file if the ulimits allow it.  If you run "ulimit -c" from a terminal window, and it comes back with "0", then no core file will be created.

If you can't find anything, maybe check the syslogs - I think most of the time you'll just get a message that just says a crash happened for a particular without a location, but some distributions with extra crash logging provide extra information.   

rowbearto

  • Senior Community Member
  • Posts: 1543
  • Hero Points: 113
Re: RC3 segmentation fault in linux
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2016, 09:38:21 pm »
I am on Red Hat 6.

"ulimit -c" is outputting 0. How to change this so I can get a core for the next time?

I checked what I think was the working dir, but no core there.

How to check the syslogs? Where are they?

patrick

  • SlickEdit Team Member
  • Senior Community Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1165
  • Hero Points: 110
Re: RC3 segmentation fault in linux
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2016, 09:51:15 pm »
If ulimit -c gave you 0, there won't be a core. 

Two ways to handle this.  The temporary way is to open a terminal window, and run "ulimit -c unlimited".  After that, everything that gets run from that terminal window will be able to dump cores, until you exit out of it.  So you'd have to start SlickEdit from that terminal window for it to inherit that ulimit setting, and then run it till it crashes.

To set it up so it's global for your login sessions, you'd have to modify the /etc/security/limits.conf.  If you're not sure about how to do that for the core file setting, I'd say you should probably check and see if your local system administrator could set that up.