Author Topic: Cross Platform Programming  (Read 3853 times)

jamis

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Cross Platform Programming
« on: August 07, 2007, 09:18:35 pm »
I'm a little new to cross-platform development, and was wondering what UI and Application Framework are used to write slickedit?  Slickedit is fast, and has a nice interface, so I was wondering what approach was taken to make it cross-platform capable.  Hopefully the answer is not too proprietary to give away.

Thank you.

davidr

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Re: Cross Platform Programming
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2007, 01:55:23 am »
Hi Jamis,

I don't know about SlickEdit, but we use Qt and C++ to develop applications for Windows, Linux, and Mac.

If you are interested, check out: http://trolltech.com/

David

Kohei

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Re: Cross Platform Programming
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2007, 02:48:30 pm »
Aside from the already mentioned QT, you can also consider wxWidgets (http://wxwidgets.org/), or even GTK+ (http://gtk.org) these days is cross-platform to a certain extent.  If your cross-platform requirement includes Mac OS X, then GTK+ may be a little stretch unless you are okay with non-native look-n-feel, but wxWidgets or QT should be a good framework to use.

The Mozilla project also offers XUL (http://www.mozilla.org/projects/xul/) as a cross-platform application framework, but then you'd be subjected to C++/javascript layering and XPCOM as the component framework.  So, the XUL may not be good for everyone.

Other apps even do the cross-platform abstraction the hard way i.e. write their own abstraction.  OpenOffice.org certainly is in this category.  But this is certainly not for the faint of heart.

Brandon Hamm

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Re: Cross Platform Programming
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2007, 04:34:08 pm »
I second wxWidgets...it provides a native look and feel, relatively easy to get going with it (on par with Windows MFC development) C++ and Python (among others to a lesser extent I believe) bindings.  Qt is popular and I work with some folks that used it before...I find it a pain in the rear to use, and attempting to debug/examine the code that their tools generate can be an exercise in futility. 



ScottW, VP of Dev

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Re: Cross Platform Programming
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2007, 02:07:13 pm »
SlickEdit has its own abstraction layer for the UI and its own application framework. Because we've been around for 20 years, we needed this capability before a solution was readily available. We've considered moving to another system, but we haven't found one where the benefits outweigh the negatives.

--Scott

jamis

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Re: Cross Platform Programming
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2007, 08:02:26 pm »
Thanks for the reply Scott.  I had wondered if slickedit employed it's own framework.  If it wasn't such a support nightmare, you could probably sell it to the public.  At this point, I'm also weighing the benefits of simply maintaining separate applications for different platforms.  Thanks to everyone for the feedback.